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The Rise, Fall, and Resurrection of Iridium: A Project Management Perspective (pg. 327)

he following describes the Case Study Analysis Approach that will be applied for each of your assignments. Case Analysis – Charter Attached File Project Charter…

he following describes the Case Study Analysis Approach that will be applied for each of your assignments.
Case Analysis – Charter
Attached File
Project Charter Template.docx Project Charter Template.docx – Alternative Formats
Adherence to APA formatting is required and the paper should include a minimum of 3 references.
Case Study for this assignment will be: The Rise, Fall, and Resurrection of Iridium: A Project Management Perspective (pg. 327)
Notes: This is a long case study. Please focus your research on errors related to poor/lack of project charter development
In every initiation phase, a charter is usually presented as a formal establishment and commitment for a project. Students will developed a detailed charter around the case study with emphasis placed around the following outcomes:
Understanding the business context around the project describing tangible and intangible deliverable(s) Analyzing the strategic perspective and how it links to organizational strategy Determining appropriate project management methodologies Recommending solutions in complex project management scenarios
A case analysis is designed to help you sharpen your analytical skills. The strongest way to analyze a case is to apply a variation of the scientific method. This method of analysis is simply a logical approach that usually includes the seven steps outlined below.
The required components of a case study are: Summarize the case. Identify and define central problem or problems. Justify problem(s) definition. Identify potential solutions. Reframe (analyze) key elements of case, paying particular attention to the efficacy of your potential solutions. Propose a specific solution. Justify your specific solution. Develop a plan for implementing and evaluating your proposed solution.
1. Summarize the Case
Study the case. Take extensive notes on events, issues, relationships, actions and reactions. When intimately familiar with case, write a summary focusing on events, decisions, actions and counter actions. Be succinct, avoid of extraneous details.
2. Identify and define central problem or problems.
Diagnose predecessor events symptomatic of dysfunction. Distinguish between presenting symptom(s) and cloaked symptom(s). Frame the definition, remembering definition suggests a solution. Cite scholarly studies to support your identification and definition. Studies should relate to the central concepts for the specific course for which the case study is being prepared.
It is important to separate the immediate problems from their more basic sources or root causes. For example, the immediate problem may be a high rate of absenteeism, while the more fundamental issue may be a poor motivational climate. How you define a problem determines how you go about solving it. A short-term solution for absenteeism is likely to be different from solutions which attempt to deal with motivational climate. Be sure to identify both the symptom and, more importantly, its underlying cause.
3. Justify problem(s) definition and statement.
Present factual evidence drawn from the case and your inferences. Inferences must be congruent with events in the case and logically drawn from both the presenting and cloaked symptoms. Inferences should be supported by scholarly research and directly relate to course concepts and events in the case.
4. Identify potential solutions.
Document potential solutions to the problem, ensuring that each logically flows from the problem definition and statement. Each potential solution is supported by scholarly research that addresses the problem. Potential solutions should reflect integration of course concepts and scholarly research.
5. Reframe (analyze) key elements of case, paying particular attention to the efficacy of your potential solutions.
Reframe the key elements of the case, paying particular attention to the efficacy of your potential solutions and their relationship to the problem as defined. Reframing is a re-capitulated summary that expresses your conclusions based on fact, inference, course concepts, and scholarly research.
6. Propose a specific solution.
Based on your reframing and review of potential solutions, course concepts and scholarly research, make a specific recommendation that addresses both the manifested and cloaked symptoms in the case. The specific recommendation may combine several of your proposed solutions.
7. Justify your specific solution.
Support your specific recommendation or combination of recommendations by citing scholarly research from at least three different scholars.
8. Develop a plan for implementing and evaluating your proposed solution.
Develop a plan for implementing your proposed solution. The plan should have concrete and measurable outcomes. Any plan should be well documented and reflect support for your strategy and tactics from the scholarly research and reflect a clear understanding of the courses central concepts
Required Resources*Austin, R. D. (2013). Project management simulation: Scope, resources, schedule V2 [Purchase directly from Harvard Business
Publishing]. Harvard Business Publishing.Clayton, M. (2011). Risk happens!: Managing risk and avoiding failure in business projects. Tarrytown, NY: Marshall Cavendish.
(ISBN: 9789814328302)
Moustafaev, J. (2011). Delivering exceptional project results:: A practical guide to project selection, scoping, estimation and management. Ft. Lauderdale, FL: J. Ross Publishing. (ISBN: 9781604270402)
Project Management Institute (2013). A guide to the project management body of knowledge: (PMBOK Guide) (5th ed.). Newtown Square, PA: Project Management Institute. PMBOK is a registered mark of the Project Management Institute, Inc.. (ISBN: 9781935589679)

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